cherylklein

Some Fun Facts

  • I grew up in a small town named Peculiar, Missouri, a few miles south of Kansas City. The town motto is “Where the odds are with you!”
  • My Internet username “Chavelaque” derives from my nickname in high-school Spanish class, "Chavela" (pronounced shah-VAY-luh), combined with the Spanish word for "what" -- que, which is pronounced "kay." It’s thus a goofy pun on “Cheryl K,” and it also appears in Lisa Yee’s So Totally Emily Ebers as the name of a fancy restaurant.
  • I appeared on “Jeopardy!” in July 2000. I took third place, but I won tickets to The Lion King.
  • My favorite non-AALB books include Charlie Parker Played Be-Bop by Chris Raschka; The Gardener by Sarah Stewart and David Small; A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett; The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley; Possession by A. S. Byatt; Jim the Boy by Tony Earley; Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke; and the complete works of Hilary McKay, Jane Austen, Jennifer Crusie, Dorothy Sayers, and Patrick O’Brian. As much as I read for my job, I still passionately love reading for pleasure, too, and will happily burble on about my current book should you ask.

A few interviews with me

 

 

The Flap Copy

Cheryl Klein is the executive editor at Arthur A. Levine Books/Scholastic, where she edits and publishes books for children, teenagers, and discerning adults. She is also the author of The Magic Words:  Writing Great Books for Children and Young Adults (W. W. Norton) and Second Sight: An Editor's Talks on Writing, Revising, and Publishing Books for Children and Young Adults (self-published). She lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband and cat, and can be found online here and as @chavelaque.

The Backstory 

Thanks to both nature and nurture, I am a total children’s book dork. My grandfather was a professor of children’s literature and founded one of the nation’s first children’s author festivals, so I grew up reading kids’ books long after it was socially acceptable to do so. I decided I wanted to go into publishing while I was still in high school; I read Publishers Weekly at Carleton College (where I majored in English, of course); I became an editorial assistant within three months of my graduation in 2000, and I gave my first talk on craft at a writers’ conference fewer than nine months after that.

I’m now the executive editor at Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint of the children’s and young-adult publisher Scholastic Inc., where I’ve worked on everything from cheerful picture books to thoughtful young adult novels to the last two books of the Harry Potter series. (For more on the books I’ve published and what I'm looking for, please see the Editorial Work page.) I think of my work as an editor as being a mechanic for stories:  I take books apart, examine their component pieces, and help my authors assemble them again as more elegant and polished machines. My writing for writers, from this point of view, is the instruction manual that comes with the cars — how I articulate the instincts and knowledge about fiction I’ve gained over fifteen-plus years of working with writers and their books.

In 2005, I started a blog, Brooklyn Arden, and put up a few talks on the first iteration of this website. The two sites quickly became popular among writers, and in April 2011, I self-published a collection of my best speeches and blog posts, entitled Second Sight:  An Editor’s Talks on Writing, Revising, and Publishing Books for Children and Young Adults. The book went through four printings, but as the years passed, I found myself writing more material and refining and deepening a lot of my thinking about the major components of fiction. My new book, The Magic Words:  Writing Great Books for Children and Young Adults, thus shares some key concepts and a few talks with Second Sight, but it is about 75% different from the first book, with a clearer structure, new essays on everything from the elements of writerly talent to writing diverse characters to what makes a great first chapter, and revised presentations of my core ideas about character and plot. I hope readers will love it just as much as the first book. (I think they will love it more.)

If you enjoy the information you find on this site, you should check out the Narrative Breakdown podcast, which I frequently cohost alongside producer (and my husband) James Monohan. Some of my favorite episodes for children’s and YA writers include: